In as few as   hours, meningitis can take her from following her dream to fighting for her life

Meningitis can progress quickly and potentially lead to death—sometimes within 24 hours.1,2

In as few as   hours, meningitis can take him from following his dream to fighting for his life

Meningitis can progress quickly and potentially lead to death—sometimes within 24 hours.1,2

In as few as   hours, meningitis can take him from following his dream to fighting for his life

Meningitis can progress quickly and potentially lead to death—sometimes within 24 hours.1,2

Meningitis can progress quickly and potentially lead to death—sometimes within 24 hours.1,2 

UNCOVER THE THREAT

From 2013 to 2019, meningococcal disease cases have been reported on 50+ US college campuses.3,

 

EXPLORE COLLEGE OUTBREAKS

 

Data based on media reports and cases reported directly to the National Meningitis Association. Additional cases that were not featured in the news may be missing.

There are 2 different types of vaccines that can help prevent meningococcal disease—one for MenB and another for MenACWY.4

LEARN ABOUT PREVENTION

Patients and their parents count on you to be up-to-date on the CDC recommendation for MenB vaccination.

 

HAVE A PATIENT DISCUSSION

Meningococcal disease can have a very real impact. Some patients don't realize the risk until it's too late.

The people in these videos are advocates for meningococcal disease vaccination. Some were compensated by GSK for their participation. These videos are personal experiences; other people’s experiences with meningococcal disease may be different.

Vaccination may not protect all recipients.

CDC=Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; MenB=meningococcal serogroup B; MenACWY=meningococcal serogroups A, C, W, and Y.

 

References: 1. Pelton SI. Meningococcal disease awareness: clinical and epidemiological factors affecting prevention and management in adolescents. J Adolesc Health. 2010;46:S9-S15. 2. Thompson MJ, Ninis N, Perera R, et al. Clinical recognition of meningococcal disease in children and adolescents. Lancet. 2006;367(9508):397-403. 3. National Meningitis Association. Meningococcal Disease on U.S. College Campuses, 2013-2019. http://www.nmaus.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Alembic_NMA_Map_r28.pdf. Updated April 2019. Accessed March 23, 2020. 4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Meningococcal vaccination for adolescents: Information for healthcare professionals. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/mening/hcp/adolescent-vaccine.html. Updated July 26, 2019. Accessed January 16, 2020.

 

Trademarks are owned by or licensed to the GSK group of companies.

 

This website is funded and developed by GSK.

This site is intended for US healthcare professionals only.

The GSK Response Center is available to answer your questions at 1-888-593-5977, Monday-Friday, 8:30 am - 5:30 pm ET.

During the hours the GSK Response Center is not available, please feel free to Contact GSK.